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Home > Extended Weather Forecast

Get the very latest weather forecast, including hour-by-hour views, the 10-day outlook, temperature, humidity, precipitation for your area.
Meteorologist Kait Parker is tracking Hurricane Matthew that's already caused wind damage and flooding to islands in the eastern Caribbean.
<p>Authorities are allowing some residents to return to their homes and other properties in Cedar Rapids' flood evacuation zone.</p>
<p>An unprecedented move on the Gulf Coast may form the blueprint for a looming, 21st century challenge</p>
<p>Forecasters in Miami say Matthew has strengthened into a hurricane as the storm continues its westward trek across the eastern Caribbean.</p>
<p>Some evacuations were lifted as cooler weather gave firefighters a boost in their struggle with a wildfire burning through dry brush that was threatening hundreds of structures Thursday in a remote area of California's Santa Cruz Mountains.</p><p><br></p>
It will feel like an extended winter for those living from the northern Plains to the eastern U.S., as cold and snowy conditions stretch into spring 2017.
Meteorologist Domenica Davis looks at the cold front which will bring some much-needed heat relief to the South.
<p>Take a look at terrestrial and marine animals that are threatened by global warming.</p>
<p>At least 32 people were reported missing Thursday after rain-saturated hillsides collapsed onto villages in southeastern China following a typhoon.</p>
To see one of the country’s largest coal-fired power plants, head northwest from this Ohio River city. Or east, because there’s another in the region. In fact, nearly every direction you go will take you to a coal plant — seven within 30 miles.
In the centuries to come, history books will likely look back on September 2016 as a major milestone for the world’s climate.&nbsp;
U.S. flooding patterns have shown some regional changes but no countrywide shift despite heavier rains spawned by global warming, a study by U.S. and Austrian researchers said on Wednesday.
A first ever Arctic Science Ministerial will coordinate nations to install new observing systems to chart the melting of the Arctic.
It’s starting to feel like my favorite time of year once more—the autumnal equinox took place last week, marking the end of summer and the start of fall across the Northern Hemisphere. Autumn is the season of harvests, festivals, migrations, winter preparations, and of course, spectacular foliage. Across the north, people are just beginning to feel a crisp chill in the evening air, leaves are splashing mountainsides with bright color, apples and pumpkins are being gathered, and animals are on the move. Collected here are some early images from this year's autumn—more will come later as the season unfolds.
<p>Take a look at these striking weather pictures from the month of September.</p>
Meteorologist Domenica Davis looks at a cold front that will be bringing days of rain to the Northeast.
The force of nature meets the stubbornness of man.
Severe storms and thousands of lightning strikes knocked out power to the entire state of South Australia on Wednesday, energy authorities said.
Indonesian authorities are searching for several hundred tourists after Mount Barujari on Lombok island spewed a massive column of ash.
Meteorologist Danielle Banks explains a new study that says greenhouse gasses may cause the planet to get warmer than we thought.
The final day of September will bring on a rare lunar event that hasn't happened in over two years; a black moon. Although more or less invisible, it'll make for perfect stargazing. Sean Dowling (@seandowlingtv) has more.
<p>Strong winds knocked down people and scattered debris as a massive typhoon crossed over Taiwan on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016.</p>
<p>Welcome to fall! Cooler temperatures are here. Now for the bad news: We're in the peak of hurricane season. This dreaded time of the year is also known as Cape Verde season, after the islands where the so-called "hurricane highway" originates. Here are seven facts about this awesome—and sometimes deadly—weather phenomenon.</p>
It's not aliens. So everyone calm the heck down. Using the Hubble Space Telescope, NASA caught sight of water plumes bursting out from Europa’s icy surface. If any Europeans are lurking beneath the moon's surface, they just got a whole lot easier to reach.
<p>An elaborate system of temporary floodwalls largely protected Cedar Rapids homes and businesses Tuesday as the river that runs through the city reached its second-highest peak ever.</p>
At least one person was injured when Typhoon Megi swept scaffolding from a high-rise construction site in central Taiwan.
A look at the coldest temperature ever recorded temperature in each of the 50 U.S. states.
<p>Unless we do more, the U.S. will likely miss the emissions target aimed for in the landmark Paris Climate Agreement last year, says a new study released Monday.</p>
Wintry weather marked the first days of autumn across parts of the Intermountain West as snow mixed in with the changing fall foliage.
MIAMI — Tropical Storm Roslyn has grown stronger than expected in the Pacific far off Mexico's coast.The U.S. National Hurricane Center says the storm's maximum sustained winds Monday afternoon are near 50 mph (81 kph). Weakening is forecast for the next two days, and Roslyn is expected to become a tropical depression Tuesday night.Roslyn is centered about 715 miles (1,151 kilometers) southwest of the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California peninsula and is moving northeast near 3 mph (6 kph).
<p>Pilot&nbsp;Christiaan van Heijst and his friend Daan Krans have taken a collection of stunning photographs from the&nbsp;cockpit of aircraft they have flown in and the results are incredible.</p>
CNN's Derek Van Dam reports on the conditions that led to the floods in Iowa and features drone video of the devastation.
Baby lobsters might not be able to survive in the ocean's waters if the ocean continues to warm at the expected rate.
A typhoon wallops Asia and an impressive full moon rises in this week's weather photos.&nbsp;
<p>On the southern shore of Utah's Great Salt Lake, more than 100 boats are sitting high and dry in a parking lot, unable to sail the shallow, drought-stricken sea.</p>
If the Earth's crust had a theme song, it would probably be Chumbawamba's '90's classic "Tubthumping". Allow me to explain. In a paper published today in Science Advances, researchers led by Shfaqat A. Khan from the Technical University of Denmark found that we might have been underestimating Greenland's ability to bounce back after thousands of years of glacial oppression, which is very bad news for estimates of sea level rise. So first some background: the Earth's interior has a mostly solid core at the center, a mantle that is made up of flexible heated rock and a very very thin layer (five to 30 miles thick) of solid rock at the edges of the planet. That crusty outer layer is called the Earth's crust. During cold periods in the Earth's history, ice starts building up on land. In large amounts, this ice becomes glaciers and ice sheets, building up into vast masses thousands of feet thick. Greenland and Antarctica have the last two significant ice sheets on Earth. With that much of a load on top of it, the crust sinks into the mantle. But when the ice melts away or gets thinner during warmer periods, the crust starts to bounce back, a process called postglacial rebound. In other words, it gets pressed down, but it gets up again, and we're never going to keep it down. New GPS measurements reported in the paper found that in some areas (where the mantle might be a little springier), Greenland's underlying land mass was rising by nearly half an inch (12 mm) every year as ice is removed. That's a big deal because many measurements of the thickness of the Greenland Ice Sheet are based on researchers measuring the elevation of the surface of the ice. The reasoning is if the ice is taller than it was last time measurements were taken, then the ice sheet is growing. If it's shorter, than the ice sheet is shrinking. And by taking many different measurements across Greenland, researchers can build up a picture of how much ice is being lost over time. These calculations do take postglacial rebound into account, but the new research suggests that Greenland is bouncing back faster then previous studies had accounted for. That means that Greenland may have lost much more ice than we'd thought. The study suggests that instead of Greenland's melting ice contributing 10.5 feet (3.2 m) to sea level rise over the past 20,000 years, the Greenland Ice Sheet has contributed around 15.1 feet (4.6 m) to sea level rise. (To put those 20,000 years in perspective see this xkcd comic for a visual of how climate has changed since then.) Greenland is still a very icy place, and contains a lot of ice that could raise sea levels much further if they continue to melt at an accelerated rate. Researchers hope that with these new, more accurate measurements they can get a more accurate picture of how Greenland is contributing to sea level rise, helping people living in coastal cities prepare for a wetter future. Anders A Bjørk Glacier in Greenland A glacier makes its way down a mountain in Greenland. Anders A Bjørk Into the Abyss A helicopter and researchers help provide a much needed size perspective on the massive sheet of ice. Shfaqat Abbas Khan Sarqardliup glacier The Sarqardliup glacier in west Greenland where it flows into the sea. Anders A Bjørk Supraglacial lake A supraglacial lake is a lake that sits on top of a glacier. Though massive, cracks that form under the surface can drain them in a matter of hours. Anders A Bjørk Meltwater Meltwater flowing into the oceans from the Greenland Ice Sheet can contribute to sea level rise.
Sep 23, 2016; 1:08 PM ET A second new moon will rise on Sept. 30. When that happens, we call it a "Black Moon." With no moon out at night, skies will darken making it perfect for stargazing under clear skies.
A government report released Wednesday said climate change is likely to pose a significant national security challenge for the U.S. over the next two decades by heightening social and political tensions, threatening the stability of some countries and increasing risks to human health.In conjunction with the report, President Barack Obama signed a presidential memorandum that orders federal agencies to account for climate change's impacts when developing national security policy.The White House said there is an increasing need for collaboration among scientists and the intelligence and national...
Thirty-one countries formally joined the Paris climate change pact Wednesday, bringing the total number of countries ratifying the treaty to 60 and raising hopes that it will enter into effect by the end of the year.The number is higher than the...

 


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